Sunday, November 18, 2012

“I don’t trust the people” ~Voreqe Bainimarama

Frank's boat is sinking but he will paddle to Ride Out the Waves

By Russell Hunter [Credit: Vilisi Nadaku : USA-Fiji Democracy Movement]

Commodore Frank Bainimarama on December 5 2006 deposed a lawfully elected government by force of arms. This was, as he and his inner circle are well aware, nothing short of treason for which the penalty is life imprisonment. So he now seeks to be somehow spirited from the tiger’s back by a promise of elections in 2014 and the construction of yet another constitution.

Even though, he has two overarching difficulties.

Part of his much-touted exit strategy is to stand for election in 2014. But the many thousands of Fiji Islanders who eagerly await their chance to remove him by means of the ballot box are doomed to disappointment. He has no intention of ceding power -not to them or anyone else.

His first problem, then, is that he has conditioned the people of Fiji (and the wider region) to doubt his word. In his takeover address of December 6, 2006 he made eleven clear pledges to the nation, none of which – not a single one – have been honoured.

Too scared to throw early party for his oppressed citizens
Frank Bainimarama's Race Card: The Great Paradox

He famously remarked “I don’t trust the people” - a sentiment now widely reciprocated. This does little for his election prospects and the harder headed elements among the military are well aware of it. The buffoonery of its public mouthpieces only partly conceals a well organized planning and intelligence function that is much closer to the reality of Fiji than the public statements would have us believe.

Bainimarama’s second highest hurdle is the perennial one of race. His promise to end racism and racial voting has gained deserved support among the commentariat. And deservedly so. The harsh reality, however, is that the majority of the people he illegally governs do not agree – and not just the ethnic Fijian majority. It will take more than a few decrees to end the politics of race in Fiji.

The Fijians strongly feel – with at least some justification – that they are the ones called upon to make all the concessions to a highly identifiable mono-cultural immigrant block that declines to assimilate. Why should it? Its culture has served it well since long before the Bible was thought of. The landless Indo-Fijian community – again with some justification – feel ostracised and unwanted in the land of their birth.

Multiculturalism has proved to be a power for good in Australian and New Zealand. In Fiji, however, there are only two cultures that for the most part stand back to back. This needs to end – but Bainimarama will not be the one to end it. It won’t be achieved by decree or by force, the only weapons left to the dictator as his past catches up with him

The military over which he has complete control still comprises some 99 per cent ethnic Fijians and Rotumans, though precise figures are no longer available in the new transparent Fiji. The language of the military is Fijian. In addition his actions against Fijian institutions, for example the Great Council of Chiefs and the Methodist Church, have engendered a seething resentment among the indigenous population – which now constitutes a clear majority, adding further difficulties for his election campaign.

Again, the military planners are well aware of this and have already produced an outline series of measures to build bridges to the ethnic Fijian population. Its effectiveness is yet to be gauged.

Sadly, too, the indigenous population increasingly regard the Bainimarama coup as an Indo-Fijian plot or, worse still, as a Muslim takeover organised by Bainimarama’s “eminence grise”, the illegal attorney general and minister for many things, Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum. The theory that Bainimarama, the honest though gullible Christian Fijian, has been exploited by a devious Indo-Fijian Muslim is gaining traction in Fiji.

Of course nothing could be further from the truth. As we now know – Bainimarama’s routine denial notwithstanding – the coup of 2006 was his fourth attempt and was driven as much by his urgent need to stay out of jail as by any “clean-up” desire. The potential for racial and religious mayhem should be obvious. Yet the dictator has done nothing to defuse this ticking bomb.

Indigenous Fijians told to dance to Bainimarama's tune

Culturally apart: many Indo-Fijians are burning with desire for change

His army is predominantly native Fijian to the boot
Immunity, Mutiny and Murder Charges

At the same time, any new constitution will have to contain an amnesty for Bainimarama and his collaborators. The crimes of treason and torture to name but two will be forgiven. But can it credibly afford to offer amnesty for the five murders that followed the mutiny of November 2, 2000, investigation of which the commander has steadfastly stonewalled? If the overwhelming reaction as expressed in submissions to the constitution commission is any guide, it’s clear that the population is set against any immunity arrangement.

That won’t stop Bainimarama. He can’t afford to let it. The betting in Suva seems to be that he’ll simply impose immunity much as he imposed the People’s Charter by the simple device of declaring that 90 per cent of the people supported it. Where is it now?

Bainimarama's Fiji an economic cot case

Wrapping himself in amnesty


Cold blood murders: CRW soldiers beaten to death
But Krankie Frankie is no longer in charter territory. An election is a quite different matter with secret voting, international observers and the desire of the people to make a statement regarding their futures. Governments (and prime ministers) offering themselves to the voters need to stand on their records. If that is so, Bainimarama is unelectable. His record stinks. As Minister of Finance he has transformed Fiji from being the powerhouse of the Pacific to an economic cot case. As Minister for Sugar he continues to preside over the death throes of an industry on which 200,000 people depend for their livelihoods.

As Minister for Fijian Affairs he has dismantled institutions, alienated the Methodist Church, and angered landholders. Yes, when he arrives in the villages boasting and glad handing, they’ll tell him what he wants to hear. Some fear to do otherwise. But even he must know that they will not vote for him. He has alienated and angered the civil service by his policy of militarisation. At the same time his secret salaries remain a matter of extreme resentment. He has slashed people’s pensions for no apparent reason – the study on which this action was based remains, like much else in Fiji, secret. It’s no way to win an election and his efforts at hand-outs (for which he rightly castigated the SDL in the 2006 election) can never hope to clean up his record in the eyes of the voters.

Gatecrasher: an unwelcome but polite acceptance
Presidential ambition and this time it's no joking matter

If an election does take place, Bainimarama cannot allow a winner other than himself. Possibly his only viable survival option lies in the white house on the hill. The illegal president’s term expires in a few days and the dictator must be tempted to have himself appointed and continue to rule by decree while indulging his taste for luxury.

But who would be prime minister? Who could be trusted? Or could the position simply lapse? Certainly the option must look preferable to an election he cannot win without rigging it. He once told the world that general elections in Fiji would take place on March 13, 2009, if all necessary preparations can be accomplished in time. But some days later Sayed-Khaiyum, now also Minister for Elections, told the media Bainimarama had only been joking. But these are no joking matters. Neither is Operation Jericho. E-mail: russellfji@gmail.com
Frank's boat is sinking but he will paddle to Ride Out the Waves
By Russell Hunter
 
Commodore Frank Bainimarama on December 5 2006 deposed a lawfully elected government by force of arms. This was, as he and his inner circle are well aware, nothing short of treason for which the penalty is life imprisonment. So he now seeks to be somehow spirited from the tiger’s back by a promise of elections in 2014 and the construction of yet another constitution.

Even though, he has two overarching difficulties.

Part of his much-touted exit strategy is to stand for election in 2014. But the many thousands of Fiji  Islanders who eagerly await their chance to remove him by means of the ballot box are doomed to disappointment. He has no intention of ceding power -not to them or anyone else.

His first problem, then, is that he has conditioned the people of Fiji (and the wider region) to doubt his word. In his takeover address of December 6, 2006 he made eleven clear pledges to the nation, none of which – not a single one – have been honoured.  
 
Too scared to throw early party for his oppressed citizens
Frank Bainimarama's Race Card: The Great Paradox

He  famously remarked “I don’t trust the people” - a sentiment now widely reciprocated. This does little for his election prospects and the harder headed elements among the military are well aware of it. The buffoonery of its public mouthpieces only partly conceals a well organized planning and intelligence function that is much closer to the reality of Fiji than the public statements would have us believe. 

Bainimarama’s second highest hurdle is the perennial one of race. His promise to end racism and racial voting has gained deserved support among the commentariat.  And deservedly so. The harsh reality, however, is that the majority of the people he illegally governs do not agree – and not just the ethnic Fijian majority. It will take more than a few decrees to end the politics of race in Fiji. 

The Fijians strongly feel – with at least some justification – that they are the ones called upon to make all the concessions to a highly identifiable mono-cultural immigrant block that declines to assimilate. Why should it? Its culture has served it well since long before the Bible was thought of. The landless Indo-Fijian  community – again with some justification – feel ostracised and unwanted in the land of their birth.

Multiculturalism has proved to be a power for good in Australian and New Zealand. In Fiji, however, there are only two cultures that for the most part stand back to back. This needs to end – but Bainimarama will not be the one to end it. It won’t be achieved by decree or by force, the only weapons left to the dictator as his past catches up with him

The military over which he has complete control still comprises some 99 per cent ethnic Fijians and Rotumans, though precise figures are no longer available in the new transparent Fiji. The language of the military is Fijian. In addition his actions against Fijian institutions, for example the Great Council of Chiefs and the Methodist Church, have engendered a seething resentment among the indigenous population – which now constitutes a clear majority, adding further difficulties for his election campaign. 

Again, the military planners are well aware of this and have already produced an outline series of measures to build bridges to the ethnic Fijian population. Its effectiveness is yet to be gauged.

Sadly, too, the indigenous population increasingly regard the Bainimarama coup as an Indo-Fijian  plot or, worse still, as a Muslim takeover organised by Bainimarama’s “eminence grise”, the illegal attorney general and minister for many things, Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum.  The theory that Bainimarama, the honest though gullible Christian Fijian, has been exploited by a devious Indo-Fijian  Muslim is gaining traction in Fiji.

Of course nothing could be further from the truth. As we now know – Bainimarama’s routine denial notwithstanding – the coup of 2006 was his fourth attempt and was driven as much by his urgent need  to stay out of jail as by any “clean-up” desire. The potential for racial and religious mayhem should be obvious. Yet the dictator has done nothing to defuse this ticking bomb.
 
Indigenous Fijians told to dance to Bainimarama's tune
 
Culturally apart: many Indo-Fijians are burning with desire for change
 
His army is predominantly native Fijian to the boot
Immunity, Mutiny and Murder Charges

At the same time, any new constitution will have to contain an amnesty for Bainimarama and his collaborators. The crimes of treason and torture to name but two will be forgiven. But can it credibly afford to offer amnesty for the five murders that followed the mutiny of November 2, 2000, investigation of which the commander has steadfastly stonewalled? If the overwhelming reaction as expressed in submissions to the constitution commission is any guide, it’s clear that the population is set against any immunity arrangement.

That won’t stop Bainimarama.  He can’t afford to let it. The betting in Suva seems to be that he’ll simply impose immunity much as he imposed the People’s Charter by the simple device of declaring that 90 per cent of the people supported it. Where is it now? 

Bainimarama's Fiji an economic cot case
 
Wrapping himself in amnesty
 
 
Cold blood murders: CRW soldiers beaten to death
But Krankie Frankie is no longer in charter territory. An election is a quite different matter with secret voting, international observers and the desire of the people to make a statement regarding their futures. Governments (and prime ministers) offering themselves to the voters need to stand on their records. If that is so, Bainimarama is unelectable. His record stinks. As Minister of Finance he has transformed Fiji from being the powerhouse of the Pacific to an economic cot case. As Minister for Sugar he continues to preside over the death throes of an industry on which 200,000 people depend for their livelihoods. 

As Minister for Fijian Affairs he has dismantled institutions, alienated the Methodist Church, and angered landholders. Yes, when he arrives in the villages boasting and glad handing, they’ll tell him what he wants to hear. Some fear to do otherwise. But even he must know that they will not vote for him. He has alienated and angered the civil service by his policy of militarisation. At the same time his secret salaries remain a matter of extreme resentment. He has slashed people’s pensions for no apparent reason – the study on which this action was based remains, like much else in Fiji, secret. It’s no way to win an election and his efforts at hand-outs (for which he rightly castigated the SDL in the 2006 election) can never hope to clean up his record in the eyes of the voters.
 
Gatecrasher: an unwelcome but polite acceptance
Presidential ambition and this time it's no joking matter

If an election does take place, Bainimarama cannot allow a winner other than himself. Possibly his only viable survival option lies in the white house on the hill. The illegal president’s term expires in a few days and the dictator must be tempted to have himself appointed and continue to rule by decree while indulging his taste for luxury. 

But who would be prime minister? Who could be trusted? Or could the position simply lapse? Certainly the option must look preferable to an election he cannot win without rigging it. He once told the world that general elections in Fiji would take place on March 13, 2009, if all necessary preparations can be accomplished in time. But some days later Sayed-Khaiyum, now also Minister for Elections, told the media Bainimarama had only been joking. But these are no joking matters. Neither is Operation Jericho. E-mail: russellfji@gmail.com

Thursday, November 1, 2012

'Miscarriage of Justice' says Adi Tupou Draunidalo, a young Fijian Lawyer. She will Appeal Hon PM Laisenia Qarase's Case.

Bula to you all,

 Well done Adi Tupou for standing up for what is 'right and just' in Fiji more so for the caseagainst Hon PM Laisenia Qarase who was convicted of something he allegedly had done 20 years ago. If that was to be the case why did Bainimarama and his regime not convict Sitiveni Rabuka for what he did in 1987?  

There is something sinister in the air each time Bainimarama signs off a decree or orders the people of Fiji as if he is the king-pin. Has he forgotten his roots or something?

Theres is enough evidence coming through from people making their submission to the Fiji Constitution Commission for the people of Fiji local and abroad as well as the International Communities to figure out that there is something so wrong with Fiji's current regime.

Whispers has it that Bainimarama's wife has just bought a house across the road from where they currently live for a substantial amount of money close to $13 million. The house was owned by one of the Lodhia family and used to be rented out to the Representative of the European Union for a large some of money. Could Mary Bainimarama have been able to afford this purchase if her husband was still in the navy? The story gets dodgier by the day and we will wait for the day that Bainimarama and members of his 2006 coup team take the stand. We have had enough of his wanting to control Fiji under gun-power. Now its Hon Qarase's turn and the next will be Bainimarama's turn in jail. 

Luvei Viti Think Tank Team.

Qarase's lawyer to appeal

Nanise Loanakadavu  [Fiji Times Online]
Thursday, November 01, 2012

FORMER Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase's lawyer Tupou Draunidalo is looking at 17 grounds of appeal on the one-year prison term imposed on her client.

She made this known while making a brief preliminary application on leave to appeal Qarase's conviction in the Fiji Court of Appeal yesterday.

Qarase appeared before Justice Suresh Chandra.

In her application, Ms Draunidalo said there was a miscarriage of justice and lawyers were confused in the trial.

She said all of those would be included in her grounds of appeal.
Fiji Independent Commission Against Corruption (FICAC) lawyer Vincent Parera however, said none of the grounds of appeal was arguable because Ms Draunidalo did not specify how justice was miscarried.

He also told the court that FICAC lawyers were not confused in the trial and Ms Draunidalo's applications should be dismissed.

Justice Chandra would deliver his ruling on the application by Ms Draunidalo on notice.
 http://www.fijitimes.com/section.aspx?s=local

Saturday, October 20, 2012

On Stuff News: "Rabuka- Father of Fiji Coups Appeared Soft Towards Bainimarama's Plan on Fiji. Why?

Below is an excerpt of Rabuka's brief on his interview with Stuff News, New Zealand. Rabuka was invited as one of the speaker at a Forum to discuss Pacific Democracy as hosted by Canterbury University. Yes, why Rabuka? we also asked. In essence its good to see him take the box infront of several experts, academics, New Zealand Political leaders such as Hon McCully, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Sir Don McKinnon and the likes. 

First up Rabuka appeared to have taken a soft approach to what is happening in Fiji. Is he propping up Bainimarama, the current diktator in Fiji? Yes, we think so, as evident from his comments about the upcoming elections and also the role of the army in Fiji. 

There are many reasons why Rabuka has done this and a few we can think of, he is protecting his patch and his interest. Period. Secondly, he is an army officer and he will take that with him to the grave. He has to keep that so called professional army ethics of keeping his mouth tightly shut. Is it good for Fiji? No. Rabuka has to ensure that he recieves his pension in his bank account as  former Prime Minister after he executed the Fiji coup d'etat for the first time in 1987. He mobilised himself and formed a political party which was defeated somewhere down the track. We then saw Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase [bless his soul as he serves his time in prison for crime he allegedly was framed to have committed to allow this current military regime to put him in goal.] Hon PM Qarase was a popular choice for most Fijians so why was he cornered by a bunch of egoistic and greedy soldiers with their hands behind their back receiving 'God knows what' to execute these coups d'etat? Rabuka propabably is beating his chest in the quiet of his home knowing fully well that he caused all these.

Another angle that seem to come through is the drastic increase of Fiji military numbers from what we are told around under 2000 to more than 6,000 plus now all because United Nations and Peace Keeping needs requires this Fijian soldiers to earn their keep by availing themselves to play 'guard roles' at International Peacekeeping locations. Have United Nations assisted in breeding a group of coup-makers in Fiji? Your answer is as good as ours. Fiji people and those with vested interested have had to face the consequences and suffer the economic, political, educational, cultural downturn of what these soldiers in Fiji and their counterparts are claiming  its all for a clean up campaign. We do say, it is for greed and for all the wrong reasons. Fiji people have suffered enough, thank you very much.

Last but not the least, the speakers chosen at this forum in Christchurch from Pacific Leaders seem biased towards East Pacific, wheres the Melanesian angle to this discussion?

In conclusion, we think Rabuka is supporting Bainimarama. The diktator seats comfortably because he is now raking in what really should be given to our Politicians, our Chiefs, Heads of other Ethnic Groups in Fiji, the Business sectors, Religious Leaders, Civil Societies, Non Profit Groups and the ordinary people of Fiji. Enough of dragging the chain Bainimarama & Rabuka, just give Fiji back to the people.   

Read more; --------------------

Rabuka has doubts about 2014 Fiji elections

CHARLEY MANN AND ANNA TURNER
Last updated 12:24 19/10/2012








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Sitiveni Rabuka
IAIN MCGREGOR/Fairfax NZ
HOPEFUL: Former Fijian Prime Minister Sitiveni Rabuka speaks at the Democracy in the Pacific conference in Christchurch today.
Democracy in Fiji rests on a fragile election that may not happen, former Fijian Prime Minister and coup leader Sitiveni Rabuka says.
If elections do not go ahead, Prime Minister and coup leader Frank Bainimarama, who is not a member of any political party, will remain in power, he said.
Rabuka, who was speaking to gathered academics at the Democracy in the Pacific conference at the University of Canterbury this morning, voiced concerns about the promised 2014 elections - the first democratic elections since Bainimarama sized power in a 2006 military coup.
''I have not seen Mr Bainimarama move in a civilian political party organisation direction, so I don't know whether he will have a party or will join one,'' he said.
''I don't know whether we will have everything in place for the 2014 elections. Whether we can meet all the deadlines and steps remains to be seen. There are still so many detractors but the programme is in place."
While he said he hoped the elections would go ahead, he said "that hope is not based on very good grounds". On Stuff News: "Rabuka- Father of Fiji Coups Appeared Soft Towards Bainimarama's Plan on Fiji. Why?

Thursday, August 23, 2012

More from Hon Mick Beddoes: Fiji Islanders unless itaukei

Our thoughts: Fiji  Citizens as Fiji Islanders & leave Fijians to Fijians, the Indigenous People. There has been no consultations whatsoever for these groups of coup stalwarts in Fiji diktator's to really in essence say they have involved the Fijian Chiefs and their people for the massive onslaught to their Indigenous Identity, Cultures, Heritage, Land, 'Qoliqoli' or Oceans and more.

Now we hear the diktator wants to split Fijians and only call those in the Rural Villages, Indigenous Fijians that but not those living in urban areas. What does Bainimarama think? Fijians are not his monkeys, to follow the so called orders he is dishing out or knee jerk reactions he seems to be having and destroying every aspect of Fijian-ness. Fiji's situation is no better than what Hitler did when he came up with his concept of the 'pure race'. This Fiji scenario is on a small scale but similar concept except Bainimarama cannot really execute his plans to totally wipe off Fijians in their own homeland. For one his soldiers are all Fijians and perhaps that clock is just a ticking 'time-bomb' if this diktator does not slow down and have a massive rethink.

We applaud reputable Fiji citizens like Mr Beddoes for his firm stand against the uncertainity Fiji sees to be at under the dictator rule. This Commission has indeed given Fiji people & the world a snapshot view of the mess Fiji is in.

When we see this line up of whos whos in this image, we ask that same question everyone is asking- what criteria were given to have such an unbalance group of people working out the intricate details of Fiji's constitution under diktatorship rule. How fair has this group been selected? Ghai is a credible gentleman globally, that we know. What about a each person's profile in this group We want a list of what credible information do each one of the bring to the table. In the iage are five laywers including our once famous young Suva bomb maker in post 1987 coup, Khaiyum Aiyas Saiyed [illegal Attorney General now]. We believe he is the king-pin of where Fiji is at now.

We wait for the day when we get to hear both these two main players in this Fiji saga. take the stand in time to come. 'One day Mafaatu'!!
Na Dina  

Sent to you by via Google Reader:

via Coup Four And A Half by Pacific in the Media on 8/21/12


 A small sample of some of the estimated 300 submissions that is keeping the Constitution Commission (pictured above the day it was sworn in) busy.

Excerpt from Mick Beddoes personal submission:

Chapter 1:    The State

Section 1:    Republic of the Fiji Islands
Amend to read:    The Fiji Islands is a sovereign, democratic state

Section 2    Supremacy of Constitution
Retain    (1) and (2)

Section 3    Interpretation of constitution
Retain    (a) and (b)

Section 4    Languages
Retain    (1), (2), (3) and (4)

English, Fijian and Hindi have equal status in the Fiji Islands

Section 5    State & religion
Retain    Although religion and the state are separate, the people of the Fiji Islands acknowledge that worship and the reverence of God are the source of good government and leadership.

Make appropriate amendments to this Chapter to incorporate the following recommendations from
Pillar 2 of the People's Charter for Change:-

Chapter 2:    The Compact

Section 6    Compact
Retain
Section 7    Application of compact
Retain

Make appropriate amendments or add to the 12 points of the Compact so as to incorporate the Shared values, vision and Principals as recommended in the  People's Charter for Change FOUNDATION FOR THE COMMON GOOD:-

Ø   Equality and dignity of all citizens
Ø   Respect for the diverse cultural, religious and philosophical beliefs
Ø   Unity among the people driven by common purpose and citizenship.
Ø   Good & Just governance
Ø   Sustained economic growth
Ø   Social & economic justice
Ø   Equal access to the benefits of development including access to basic needs and services
Ø   Merit based equality of opportunities for all
3


Chapter 3:    Citizenship

Section 8:    retention of existing citizenship
Retain
Add sub section 8 (1)    All citizens to be known as 'Fiji Islanders' and our Itaukei
Known as 'Fijians'
Section 9 to 20    retain

Inert a new section in this chapter on dual citizenship as follows:

Dual Citizenship is permitted provided that the holder of dual citizenship is:-

i.    Not eligible to vote in Municipal or National elections
ii.    Declares all earnings in Fiji and pays tax on those earnings
iii.    Does not actively seek paid employment which would displace a local from work iv.    Loses the right to the dual citizenship if convicted of any criminal offence in Fiji.

Chapter 4:    Bill of Rights

Section 21 to 43    retain

And add a new section to incorporate recommendations from as follows:-

I.    Only a duly elected parliament can waiver or restrict any of the rights outlined in Chapter 4.
II.    Any elected member of the executive [cabinet] parliament, senate, or member of the judiciary, civil service, police and military who supports a group that has usurped the authority of an elected government, to waiver or reduce the rights of the citizens as laid out in this chapter will be guilty of the offence of Treason against the people.

Chapter 5:    Social Justice

Retain and strengthen this Chapter by inserting where appropriate recommendations from Pillar 2 and
Pillar 8 of the People's Charter for Change covering:-

Ø   Develop a national moral vision for the common good
Ø   Conduct national interfaith dialogue and sharing of spiritualities
Ø   Promote shared national values through the national education curriculum
Ø   Ensure teaching of the vernacular [Vosa Vakaviti , Hindi]and comparative study of major religions
Ø   Promote multi cultural education
Ø   Phase out institutional names that denote racial affiliations
Ø   Promote national vision, narratives, rituals and symbols. One national anthem to be in the 3 languages; flag ceremony to be observed in all schools and important state functions
Ø   Review and revitalize the National Youth Service Scheme
Ø   Eliminate racial categorization in all government records and registers

Add a new section to deal specifically with Poverty and the inclusion of the recommendations of Pillar 8 [Reducing Poverty] and a specific Section to protect the pension rights of pensioners.


Excerpt from  submission by Ro Felipe Tuisawau, Chief of Rewa Province
Recognizing and reaffirming that indigenous individuals are entitled without discrimination to all human rights recognized in international law, and that indigenous peoples possess collective rights which are indispensable for their existence, well-being and integral development as peoples,
Recognizing that the situation of indigenous peoples varies from region to region and from country to country and that the significance of national and regional particularities and various historical and cultural backgrounds should be taken into consideration,
Solemnly proclaims the following United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a standard of achievement to be pursued in a spirit of partnership and mutual respect:
Article 1
Indigenous peoples have the right to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international human rights law.
Article 2
Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be  free  from any kind  of discrimination,  in the exercise of their  rights,  in particular  that  based  on their indigenous origin or identity.
Article 3
Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.
Self determination is a human right for we the Fijian people to elect our own representatives in Parliament. We oppose any move to to do away with Fijian Communal Seats in the Provinces.
Article 4
Indigenous  peoples,  in  exercising  their  right  to  self-determination,  have  the  right  to  autonomy  or  self-government in matters relating to their internal and local affairs, as well as ways and means for financing their autonomous functions.
Self government and autonomy is exercised via the Great Council of Chiefs, the Provincial Councils and the Tikina Councils. These institutions must be revived, upheld and strengthened. Fijians and their institutions must evolve towards self government and autonomy.
Article 5
Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions, while retaining their right to participate fully, if they so choose, in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the State.
We have a right to maintain our own chiefly, traditional, provincial, tikina and cultural systems and to evolve and review these ourselves without state or non indigenous interference.
Article 6
Every indigenous individual has the right to a nationality.
Fiji must have a national identity and could be  "Fiji Islander" as we are now called the Republic of Fiji Islands. The National Anthem could only be in the Fijian language because obviously we are in Fiji and not England.
Article 7
1.  Indigenous individuals have the rights to life, physical and mental integrity, liberty and security of person.
Indigenous rights activists must not be victimised and labelled as racists. Such actions are simplistic and counter productive. However, open discussion of the concerns of Fijians as indigenous people must be encouraged. Since the coup of 2006, Fijians have who have expressed concerns about their rights have been victimised and their human rights abused. The elected representatives of Fijians indigenous rights activists must not be victimised and labelled as racists. Such actions are simplistic and counter productive. However, open discussion of the concerns of Fijians as indigenous people must be encouraged. Since the coup of 2006, Fijians have who have expressed concerns about their rights have been victimised and their human rights abused. The elected representatives of Fijians have been removed by the gun, harassed, assaulted and still continue to be thrown into prison.
Recommendation: The above to be resolved via a National Consultation Workshop.
 
Excerpt from submission by Ian Simpson
I believe and propose a State sanctioned One Party State. Up to date, elections have cost $30 million plus which equates to $6 million dollars on a year to year basis in a 5 year election cycle. I suggest that $6m can fund or nearly fully fund a state sponsored party in a  democratic structure that engages and gives the whole populace a permanent and inclusive say in the governance and administration of our country.
I think we should have 4 year election cycles within the One Party State, to run for a 4 cycle (16 years) term, before the people may hold a referendum to continue or discontinue with a One Party State.
I also think that participation should be built on the basis of leaders of 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000. With an estimated 600,000 voters, this will give us 60 representatives in the National Congress. This system should avoid the party from being hijacked by any one special interest group or ideology.
Not in any way to pre-empt contributions on the development of the structure of a One Party State, if the people should adopt this proposal, I would like to make a couple of broad suggestions at least, just to give a feel for what is possible. Our National Congress, does not need be limited to 60 seats. I would propose an additional 40 seats or more for a balance that would be drawn from, say one each of the 20 District Guardian Councils (more on this in a separate submission – essentially these are de-centralised district Public Service Commissions ), a number from business, professional and civic organisations, with maybe a rep each from our two Cities. The Central committee, or equivalent of cabinet and other structures in the executive or administration of government can be addressed at a later stage, lets for now stay with the broad strokes of my proposal.

Beddoes' Constitution recommendations
Covering letter to Commission
Speaking notes on GCC
Constitution submission FTuisawau
Ian Simpson CCSubmission

Things you can do from here:

Monday, August 20, 2012

Beddoes Takes a Hit at Bainimarama for the Diktator's Daily Dose of Threats to Fiji People: Shame, Shame on you Bainimarama!!

Credit: Coup 4.5: Our comments - Mick Beddoes is a well reknowned Politician and a credible business man. He is one of those that have worked hard to prop up the Tourism Industry in Fiji for many years. What we cannot understand is how this diktator is slamming at every reputable Fiji person be their business man or Indigenous Fijians or academic for that matter. We are asking that same question everyone else is asking; WHAT IS SO WRONG WITH THIS DIKTATOR'S THINKING?? Has he lost the plot somewhere?
Luvei Viti Think Tank Team.

Sent to you by via Google Reader:

via Coup Four And A Half by Pacific in the Media on 8/17/12

Commission at work. pic Fiji Times
Exercise restrain and try and stay within the provisions of your own decrees!
 
That's the message from the president of the United Peoples Party, Mick Beddoes, to the illegal leader, Frank Bainimarama.
 
Beddoes says Bainimarama's almost daily denunciation and threats against people making submissions to the Constitution Commission and his attack on the Chair, Yash Ghai, is in clear breach of
Decree 57 of 2012 and in particular Section 7 (1) a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h and Sec 11 (1)  General Provisions.
 
He says if Bainimarama keeps it up, he will undermine the entire process and wipe out any credibility his Commissioners have managed to achieve so far.
Mick Beddoes
Rajendra Chaudhry
Bainimarama revealed his anger this week that Ghai was making time for his enemies, NGO's and political parties and had even met privately with some of them.
 
He said: "That is the problem that we have here. He (Ghai) is pressured by these NGOs and politicians. These are the same group of people that want to have a hand in the composition of the Constituent Assembly so that they can pressure him into doing this and to changing what they want done and in the Constituent Assembly, have it cemented before they move into elections."
 
He referred to the situation as so: "What is happening is like a proverbial camel.  They come in with their head into the tent and then their whole body comes in and they kick the owner of the tent out. That's what him and the people they are listening to are trying to do. They are trying to get us back, bring back the old statements that they have been going on with for the last couple of months." 
 
Beddoes has confirmed he and his political colleagues met with the 'full commission' saying a second meeting was planned but had to be postponed because of the FEA blackout. 
 
He says the meeting was by appointment and at his reqeust, not the Commission's. And he says they were grateful Ghai and the Commissioners were willing to meet with  them, just as he hoped they would be willing to meet with anyone else who might need to.
 
Beddoes says Sec 7 (1) (f) (ii) of Decree 57 permits meetings in private and if Bainimarama keeps up his attacks on submitters, than he will not be surprised if people start opting for private and written submissions to avoid being the subject of personal and malicious attacks, 'courtesy of Fiji's compromised Media industry, just for presenting an alternative thought to the process'.
 
He says the current attitude on display from the regime reminds him of a famous speech made by Sir Winston Churchill to the American people on Oct 16 1938:
 
"'People say, many people, we ought not to allow ourselves to be drawn into a theatrical antagonism between Nazism & Democracy? But the antagonism is here!  NOW!
 
"You see these Dictators standing on their pedal stools surrounded by the bayonets of their soldiers and the truncheons of their police!   They are afraid of words and thoughts, words spoken abroad and thoughts stirring at home, all the more powerful because they are forbidden.
 
These terrify them, a little mouse; a tiny little mouse of thought appears in the room and even the mightiest potentate is thrown into panic.'"
 
Beddoes says a little more humility, respect and trust in the people, the Commissioners and the process might be a 'worthwhile investment' for the regime at this time.
 
Earlier this week, Suva lawyer and the son of the FLP party leader, Rajendra Chaudhry, also tackled Bainimarama's determined efforts to have control.
 
"I think that it is about time Bainimarama also decides whether he wants to be a politician or an Army Commander. He cannot do both because there is a very clear conflict of interest and the Public Service Regulations address this. So why is there special exception for this man."
 
He also questioned why Bainimarama is making comments about the submissions, rubbishing those those that he doesn't like. Chaudhry says Bainimarama is bullying the process and trying to control the outcome of the talks.
 
Chaudhry also urged the Commission to disregard the non-negotiable principles stipulated by the regime saying it should take the view of the majority of the people.
 
"It should not be influenced in any manner, shape or form by anybody, least of all by the Interim Prime Minister Mr Bainimarama who is obviously an interested party in the proceedings of the Constitution Commission and they are making comments on submissions by other political parties or NGOs. That is not proper for him to do. Let the people express their views, let the commission record those views."
 
Bainimarama has told media he has been both Prime Minister and Army Commander in the last six years because of circumstances saying: "I'm going to be the Commander RFMF and Prime Minister for the next two years until elections and unfortunately for him and his father there is nothing they can do to change that."

Things you can do from here:

Friday, August 17, 2012

Fiji: "Crime Rate Alarm!" [Are We Surprise??]

Sent to you by via Google Reader:

via Fiji Times Online - Local News by Maciu Malo on 8/16/12

A TOTAL of 3287 crimes were registered by police in the Western Division for the last two quarters.
-----------------------------------
Comments:

On Wednesday, August 15, 2012, New Zealand Dominion Post ran a Front Page article on Poverty Close to Home as lifted out of 'Statistics from Oxfam and Unicef'.

Fiji scored a 25% on of 'population living below the National Basic Needs Poverty Line'.

These statistics is adequate to give us a clue as to why there will be a crime rate increase in urban areas in Fiji as can be seen in the above Fiji Times report. Bainimarama and his regime cannot deny that because of the forceful reform they are trying to implement under power of guns, the downside will be Fiji's social ills is on the upward trend.

The elite within Bainimarama's regime inner-circle will not want to address Poverty as it stands. These will be handed over to their favoured Non Profit Groups that play 'yes-man' to the diktator to handle. If the Police are breaking at the seams because of increase Crimes then would it not be wise for this regime to give up their games and quickly return Fiji to normalcy. To be honest, everyone is tired of the dragged out situation in Fiji. Everyone's patience has been exhausted. All one has to do is read blogs and comments on facebooks and listen to conversations to feel what people of Fiji are feeling.

What is becoming evident is the trial and error type of games being played by this Fiji diktator to try and figure out which will be the best solution for the mess they have put Fiji into. No matter what sort of white washing Bainimarama and Khaiyum are doing, the truth of the matter, People are tired of their egoistic plans for a new Fiji.

For all we know, the figures on Fiji's Poverty % could very well be rigged seeing how alledgedly corrupt and brutal these regime has been post 2006 to today.

Anyway, for ease of interpretation, here is the excerpt from NZ Dom Post Wed 15/8/12.."National Basic Needs Poverty Line is a measure of the minimum income needed to buy sufficient food and meet basic requirements such as housing, clothing, transport, school fees etc."~Statistics from Oxfam and Unicef

Just to make sense of what sort of guidance super powers used to guide their way through finding good governance and framing its constitution, we thought to share with you what the Americans did in the hey days and what conversations they had on which way they were to lead their people.

Luvei Viti Think Tank Team.
email : fijitruthcom@gmail.com

quote

"Indeed, Aristotle was credited as the original source for many doctrines generally affirmed by the Founders, including the following five:
  1. government should govern for the good of the people, not for the good of those in power;
  2. there is a natural aristocracy, and skilled statecraft arranges things so that this element acquires authority, or, failing that, blends democratic and oligarchic influences in society to approximate to that outcome;
  3. mixed regimes are better than pure regimes, because they are more stable;
  4. the best form of government in nearly all circumstances involves the balancing of aspects of all three pure regimes (kingship, aristocracy, and timocracy);
  5. a pure democracy can easily turn into a tyranny of the majority.
However, the teaching of Aristotle that was most admired by the Founders was his insistence upon the rule of law, especially as stated in a passage from the Politics, where law is said to be reason or intelligence (nous), free from passion, and, as it were, the governance of God.[4] Their imagination in this regard seems to have been captured by several passages that indicate a conception of the institution of the rule of law as akin to the institution of the Kingdom of God. As James Harrington wrote:
But that we may observe a little farther how the Heathen politicians have written, not only out of nature, but as it were out of Scripture: as in the commonwealth of Israel God is said to have been king; so the commonwealth where the law is king, is said by Aristotle to be the kingdom of God. And where by the lusts or passions of men a power is set above that of the law deriving from reason, which is the dictate of God, God in that sense is rejected or depos’d that he should not reign over them, as he was in Israel.[5]" unquote. 
~ARISTOTLE, NATURAL LAW, and the FOUNDERS
Michael Pakaluk, Ave Maria University


Things you can do from here:

Sunday, August 12, 2012

The Perils of Indigenous Fijians: "It sounds like Commodore Bainimarama is Advocating for a Free Market Capitalist Approach to Fiji...!"


A quick reflections/comment from Mr Peter Jones: 
One of our much valued Indigenous expert in Luvei Viti Think Tank Forum.

I am not familiar with all of the documents or reports, but from what is contained here, it sounds like Commodore Bainimarama is advocating for a free market capitalist approach to Fiji, its people and land. By advocating for the elimination of ethnic voting, he is essentially advocating for the end of indigenous rights. Similarly, proportional representation would deny indigenous voices. Likewise, a common and equal citizenry would deny any recognition of indigenous Fijian people. These are very common "goals" or statements put forward in modern capitalist based democracy. If you eliminate any of the indigenous voices, make everyone the exact same in terms of rights, land rights, representation, etc., it will deny indigenous people their voice. It will also slowly divest the land from indigenous people, allowing it to be bought by corporations and exploited or developed without any 
future voice of indigenous people. It is much easier for Commodore Bainimarama to encourage foreign investments (mining, tourism, etc.) if he can say that there are no indigenous Fijians, everyone has had an equal voice, and that the land is for sale (because when you take land out of collective ownership and allow it to be owned by individuals, more often then not you can buy that land from those individuals for a fairly low price - but usually not from the collective group). 

It is essential that indigenous Fijians keep the land in collective ownership, continue to fight for reinstatement of the GCC, and demand that the government work with them on a government to government relationship. Indigenous people are recognized as sovereign people under UNDRIP and ILO 169 (which Fiji ratified), and have a right to decide how they want their land and heritage to develop. Commodore Bainimarama continues his assault on indigenous rights, and if he continues and gets his way, he will simply work the laws until there is no such thing as indigenous Fijian people (as they are trying to do in Bangladesh, by taking the word "indigenous" and substituting 
"ethnic minority" in government documents and laws), simply Fijians. 

You can share this message - this is my quick response.

Peter
-----------------------------------
PM: SDL Quit
Fiji Sun 11th August 2012

By Maika Bolatiki

Prime Minister Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama did not mince his words when he called on the Soqosoqo Duavata ni Lewenivanua (SDL) party yesterday to, “wind up now”.
Reacting to the summary of the SDL submission presented by members to the Constitution Commission, the Prime Minister said the party had nothing new to offer Fiji.
“It is better for them to wind up and don’t be bothered about the leadership of the country,” Commodore Bainimarama said.
The Prime Minister said the SDL submission summary were the same things that led the military to take over leadership in 2006.
“The military had taken over leadership to take Fiji on a new journey and the people are enjoying the new journey now.
“Our journey to a better and new Fiji will need new ideas and the SDL submission would take the country back to the early 19th century.”
The main objective of Government as displayed in the People’s Charter, the Prime Minister said, was to rebuild Fiji into a non-racial, culturally vibrant and united, well-governed, truly democratic nation; a nation that seeks progress and prosperity through merit-based equality of opportunity and peace.
“To steer our nation forward to a better Fiji for all. The Prime Minister adds, “we need visionary, transformative leaders who place the interests of the nation first including national development, good and just governance, and unity.”
He said the SDL submission again promoted racism and racial discrimination.
The SDL leadership has not learned from the past mistakes and the Prime Minister has urged party supporters to make their own submission.
Commenting on the SDL proposal to bring back the Great Council of Chiefs (GCC), the Prime Minister said this would never happen.
He said people should make quality submission, so we would have a quality Constitution for Fiji.
“Fiji needs a good and quality Constitution.”
Commodore Bainimarama called on all Fijians to make good use of this one-off opportunity and make submissions that would be good for the nation.
He said the Constitution must be premised on the fundamental values and principles set out in the People’s Charter for Change, which his Government has been advocating and implementing.
These principles and values are universally recognised and aspired to. Therefore, these principles and values are non-negotiable. They are:
• A common and equal citizenry;
• A secular State;
• The removal of systemic corruption;
• An independent judiciary;
• Elimination of discrimination;
• Good and transparent governance;
• Social justice;
• One person, one vote, one value;
• The elimination of ethnic voting;
• Proportional representation; and
• A voting age of 18.
When contacted yesterday the SDL office said they would reply when their full detailed submission was made.
Party president Solomoni Naivalu had earlier said this had been summarised for presentation at different venues by their constituent leaders on behalf of the party.

Thursday, August 9, 2012

A Fijian Open Lament on Indigenous Issues in Fiji: International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples - Thursday 9 August

Below is a link to UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon's speech to mark International Day of the World's Indigenous People. The UN Secretary General articulated well how Indigenous People are to be respected and viewed with regards to their way of life and most of all in sharing and telling their stories of injustices done to them.

As Fijians and blogging about this, we feel compelled to specifically draw the world's attention to what is happening in our little corner of Fiji world. It is under a military dikatorship under Voreqe Bainimarama and his legal advisor Aiyaz Khaiyum Saiyad. The two are visibly seen and noted to be the source of manipulating and destructing what Fijians [Indigenous] hold dear, our Fijian Culture and Fijian Identity.

Interestingly, no one else is being seen to be so heavily marginalised in Fiji but the Fijians themselves. Their identity of being called Fijians are being stripped from them and handed out freely without even considering their views on the matter. How insulting can this be for a Race in their own home turf? Not so long ago, the current regime forced retirement to all civil servants over the age of 5o years and most of these were Fijians [Indigenous] holding key positions eg teachers, doctors, police, nurses, administrators, surveyors and more. The Great Council of Chiefs was abolished by Bainimarama and Khaiyum, Their lifelong saving of Fiji National Provident Fund siphoned to prop up an ailing Hotel Resort in the Western Division which notably had some Fiji Indian up in Auckland playing the middle man in the money deals with a local New Zealand Company. These retired Fijians went home with nothing after having served Fiji Government for so many years. Is this fair to call it clean up? Or was Bainimarama clearing the way for his Team 2006 Coup maniacs?

Fijians are being beaten up to death and thrown in jail by Fijian army soldiers trained by United Nation for Peace Keeping and causing havoc at home in Fiji. To make matters worse these soldiers are Fijians and seen to be mistreating their own kind, why? Are they just  following orders or have they been brainwashed to turn against their own?

 Furthermore, Chiefly system are being the target of much criticisms, why? Bainimarama and Khaiyum in their arrogant stance, have stripped the very essence of what represents these Fijian people, why? Many non-Fijians and are living in Fiji or abroad are freely giving their views that Fijians are the problems in Fiji, why? Is not Fiji made up of other races that are bringing in their side of social problems to make things complex for the nation? Or are they the perfect race and so the problems lies squarely with Fijians themselves? Fiji's regime have also conveniently convicted one of our Fijian Leaders, Hon Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase and thrown him in prison a few days ago. His sins are ones allegedly committed 20 years ago, why now? This is another strategy we have observed to just weaken Fijians in their power base so when voting comes 2014 election. The Fijian power base has been weakened to the knees. Who are these regime trying to fool? Fijians are patient people and will sit things through especially those that hold Chiefly titles and in Rural Fiji and even most of our educated young ones. This Fiji regime's intent is becoming clearer by the day. 

As Fijians, we are fully aware of the view by the likes of Nik Naidu who recently got airtime with Mr Manning; On Fiji with Selwyn Manning . Whilst the interview ranged widely on issues impacting on Fiji, one thing that flagged our interest is the manner Nik Naidu continued to harp about reducing the power base for Indigenous Fijians. What is Nik Naidu's problem? Fiji is home to Indigenous Fijians just like whats happening in Tonga, Samoa, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands. The Indigenous people in these islands will be the majority in number until cross-breeding takes effect in the the next centuries or so. How about leave Fijians alone to enjoy peace once and for all. Nik Naidu, as we all knew him post Rabuka Coup of 1987 was noted to be making home-made bombs with current illegal attorney general Aiyaz Khaiyum Saiyed and is now Bainimarama's right hand man. To make matters worse, Nik Naidu does not even live in Fiji and for all we know does not even send money back home as they are all known to be. They make money in Fiji and take it out not leave it there. Fijians [Indigenous] are very much aware of what these people like nik Naidu are doing to Fiji. Indirectly they are propping the regime as we it.. Does Nik Naidu and his co-horts know that Fijians have had a blanket ban on Seasonal work scheme in New Zealand? The only ones allowed and not banned are the Halal Slaughterman from Fiji working in Meat works in New Zealand under seasonal scheme? Who gets to become more poorer in Fiji then? The Fijians themselves.

This day today, marks the celebration of Indigenous People around the world. It is our hope that Bainimarama and Khaiyum and those like them that are doing so much to deconstruct the very essence of who we are as Indigenous Fijians will be forced to have a RETHINK! 

Luvei Viti Think Tank Team

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Message from the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, marking the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples on Thursday 9 August. 

This year's theme is:
Indigenous Media, Empowering Indigenous Voices. You can find out more information about the day and its theme at http://www.un.org/en/events/indigenousday/


Bula, No'oia, Kia Ora, Warm Greetings, Namaste

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